Mormon and Asian American model minority discourses in news and popular magazines

by Chiung Hwang Chen

Publisher: Edwin Mellen Press in Lewiston, NY

Written in English
Cover of: Mormon and Asian American model minority discourses in news and popular magazines | Chiung Hwang Chen
Published: Pages: 295 Downloads: 965
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Places:

  • United States,
  • United States.

Subjects:

  • Mormons -- United States -- Public opinion.,
  • Asian Americans -- Public opinion.,
  • Minorities -- United States -- Public opinion.,
  • American periodicals.,
  • Reportage literature, American -- History and criticism.,
  • English language -- United States -- Discourse analysis.,
  • Public opinion -- United States.,
  • United States -- Ethnic relations.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

StatementChiung Hwang Chen.
SeriesMellen studies in journalism ;, v. 8
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE184.M8 C46 2004
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 295 p. :
Number of Pages295
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3306272M
ISBN 100773463755
LC Control Number2004050716

H istorian Ellen Wu’s The Color of Success: Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority just might be the best examination of the roots of the model minority stereotype in print.. More Author: Scot Nakagawa.   'Model Minority' Myth Again Used As A Racial Wedge Between Asians And Blacks: Code Switch The perception of universal success among Asian-Americans is being wielded to downplay racism's role in.   Asian Americans do not have a Martin Luther King, Jr. to look to in their history and struggle for civil rights. Moses Y. Lee explains how Asian Americans are benefactors of the Civil Rights Movement, and should more readily acknowledge and honor the sacrifices the African American community has made and continues to make for all minorities. Racial Castration, the first book to bring together the fields of Asian American studies and psychoanalytic theory, explores the role of sexuality in racial formation and the place of race in sexual L. Eng examines images—literary, visual, and filmic—that configure past as well as contemporary perceptions of Asian American men as emasculated, homosexualized, or queer.3/5(1).

  Summary: Because Asian-Americans are often better off educationally and economically than whites and other minorities, many people believe in the racial stereotype that Asian-Americans are the model minority. This stereotype argues that Asians are naturally smarter or always fare better because of their strong “family values” and work ethic. For undergraduate courses in Sociology of Asian Americans or Introduction to Asian American Studies. Combining the rigor of scholarship with the accessibility of journalism, this text examines the contemporary history, culture, and social relationships that form the fundamental issues confronted by Asians in America today. Ellen D. Wu, a history professor at Indiana University, is the author of “The Color of Success: Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority.” She wrote this for the Los Angeles Times.   An honest book written by an Asian male with the subtitle “In Search of My Asian Self” cannot shy away from this subject, and while some might find all the penis talk distasteful or perhaps.

  Modern Societal Impacts of the Model Minority Stereotype highlights current research on the implications of the model minority stereotype on American culture and society in general as well as Asian and Asian-American populations. An in-depth analysis of current social issues, media influence, popular culture, identity formation, and. The “model minority” stereotype has long plagued Asian communities in the United States. To mark the 50 th anniversary of the term in , the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center launched a social media campaign to call attention to the ways it hurts Asian Americans and limits how others see and understand them.   In her book, The Color of Success: Asian-Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority, historian Ellen Wu explained how the American mainstream finally changed its .   Forget the tired stereotype of the “Tiger Mom” who demands A’s and perfect violin performances from her Asian American children—or else. A new project from the U.S. Department of Education aims to dispel the “model minority” myth and turn the spotlight on the real academic struggles of Asian American and Pacific Islander students in the nation’s public schools.

Mormon and Asian American model minority discourses in news and popular magazines by Chiung Hwang Chen Download PDF EPUB FB2

Mormon and Asian American model minority discourses in news and popular magazines. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Chiung Hwang Chen.

Manuscript situates news and popular magazines’ coverage of Asian Americans and Mormons within model minority discourse, explains the discourse’s problematic nature, and points out how the two discourses shape power relations between majorities and minorities in American society.

The book employs critical discourse analysis, a powerful tool to uncover ideology within dominant discourses Pages: Chen, Chiung Hwang pages Manuscript situates news and popular magazines’ coverage of Asian Americans and Mormons within model minority discourse, explains the discourse’s problematic nature, and points out how the two discourses shape power relations between majorities and minorities in American society.

The book employs critical discourse analysis, a. discuss how the myth of the “American Dream” permeates (Black) Mormon and (Asian) model minority discourses.

I end by explaining how Black Mormonism is an example of disguised Asian model minority discourse. Last, implications are shared for race relations and Black education.

MethodologyAuthor: Nicholas Daniel Hartlep. By Joel Aug I have recently been exploring Chiung Hwang Chen’s book Mormon and Asian American Model Minority Discourses in News and Popular Media which, along with her and her husband Ethan Yorgason’s Dialogue article, makes the case that the media has portrayed both Asian Americans and Mormons in the last fifty years utilizing what Asian American scholars have.

The Color of Success tells of the astonishing transformation of Asians in the United States from the "yellow peril" to "model minorities"--peoples distinct from the white majority but lauded as well-assimilated, upwardly mobile, and exemplars of traditional family values--in the middle decades of the twentieth century.

As Ellen Wu shows, liberals argued for the acceptance of these immigrant Cited by: Rosalind S. Chou, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Georgia State University, is the author of Asian American Sexual Politics and co-author with Joe Feagin of The Myth of the Model Minority.

Joe R. Feagin, currently Ella C. McFadden Professor at Texas A&M University, graduated from Baylor University in and acquired his Ph.D. in 5/5(7). In her book, “The Color of Success: Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority,” historian Ellen Wu explained how the American mainstream finally changed its mind about Asian Americans.

There are many examples of affluence and prosperity within the Asian American population but in many ways, we still face the same types of racism, social inequality, and institutional discrimination that other groups of color face. Therefore, the image that the entire Asian American community is the "model minority" is a myth.

In this book, W. Paul Reeve explores the ways in which nineteenth century Protestant white America made outsiders out of an inside religious group. Much of what has been written on Mormon otherness centers upon economic, cultural, doctrinal, marital, and political differences that set Mormons apart from mainstream America.

Mormon and Asian American model minority discourses in news and popular magazines. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press. [[[b][Lg: eng][ISBN: ][Mormons][Asian Americans][Minorities][American periodicals][Reportage literature, American][English language][Public opinion]]].

This book provides a sweeping and nuanced history of Asian Americans, revealing how and why the perception of Asian immigrants changed over time. Asian migrants, in large part Chinese, arrived in significant numbers on the West Coast during the s and s to work in gold mining and on the construction of the transcontinental Railroad.

As I and many other scholars have written, Asian Americans are frequently portrayed as the “model minority” — a group of Americans who have worked to overcome difficulties in our way in order to achieve socioeconomic success, who have quietly persevered to get ahead in American society rather than resorting to political confrontation, and therefore, stand as examples for other racial.

Identifying Asian Americans as a “model minority” often erases the continued discrimination faced by Asians in America.

Police officer Peter Liang leaves the courtroom at the end of the day in his trial on charges in the shooting death of Akai Gurley, Tuesday, Feb.

9,at Brooklyn Supreme court in New York. The "model minority" stereotype, which suggests that Asian Americans are hard-working, technologically-savvy, business-oriented, successful, and well-assimilated is clearly reflected in. Historian Ellen Wu’s The Color of Success: Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority just might be the best examination of the roots of the model minority stereotype in print.

More than just a connect-the-dots documentation of the rise of the model minority myth, The Color of Success succeeds at putting the myth in a much broader social and political context, positioning the. This book dispels notions that Asian Americans are universally "favored" by whites and have an easy time adapting to life in American society.

The authors conclude with policy measures that can improve the lives not only of Asian Americans but also of other Americans of color. The Model Minority Stereotype: Demystifying Asian American Success. 80 likes. This book covers the relevant literature related to the model minority stereotype and its effects on ers:   The most poignant consequence of the model minority label is its failure to acknowledge socioeconomic and education disparities among the diverse.

Historically, the model-minority stereotype has served an even more disturbing purpose. For years, Asian American men were represented in mainstream media as Author: Adia Harvey Wingfield.

Last week’s report from the Pew Research Center, The Rise of Asian Americans, has stirred up much controversy. Many advocates in the Asian American and Pacific Islander (API) community are arguing that the findings further a damaging idea about Asian Americans — the “model minority” myth.

Advocates have said that these myths, which include the idea that Asian Americans are wealthier. Journal of Southeast Asian American Education and Advancement Volume 12 Issue 2 50 Years of Model Minority Stereotype Research Article 1 The Model Minority Maze: Hmong Americans Working Within and Around Racial Discourses Stacey Lee University of Cited by: 1.

Deseret NewsMormon-ad-campaign-draws-attention-inUS-markets Excellent case study of LDS (Mormon) SEO strategy Mormon and Asian American model minority discourses in news and popular magazines Author: Chiung Hwang Chen. According to the model minority myth, the Asian American community has nothing to complain about because they are doing so well.

This is an incorrect statement because although we are considered to be the “racial middle” and more closely related to whites than blacks, Asian Americans face their own set of issues and concerns in contemporary America.

In the s, the media broadly applied the label of the model minority to newly arrived Asian immigrants, who were upheld as models of racialized success in the U.S.

Before this time, from about to the post WWII decade, Asians in the U.S. were, as educator and researcher Jean Yonemura Wing puts it, “dehumanized as an unsavory foreign.

Asian-Americans face significant challenges to getting their education, says a new report out from the National Commission on Asian-American and Pacific Islander Research in Education.

And the study has got everyone from experts to students talking, because the findings fly in the face of conventional wisdom about Asian American students as high-achieving, so-called model minorities.

But statistics — and the model minority myth that Asian American students get perfect grades and go to Ivy League universities — can hide those problems by treating Asian Americans as a. First and second generation Asian-American adolescents have internalized model minority standards of success with devastating results.

Because education occurs during developmental years, these attitudes leave a deep, psychological imprint on involved youth. Asian Americans speak out against a decades-old ‘model minority’ myth pushback from the Asian American community to be so great NBC.

Before writing the popular 'Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother', Amy Chua dealt with ethnic and sociological divisions in regard to economic and governmental systems in various societies. In World on Fire, she explains why Chinese Filipinos represen.

This video consists of a series of interview excerpts conducted with students and faculty immediately following the “The Myth of the Asian American Model Minority” discussion. Explore #.Chen, C. H. (). From Pariah to Paragon: Mormon and Asian American Model Minority Discourse in News and Popular Magazines.

[Dissertation]. [Download] Chen, J. L. (). The Internalization of the Model Minority Stereotype as a Predictor of Depression Among Chinese Americans. [Dissertation]. [Download] Cheung, E.

M-W. ().A “Model” Minority: Japanese Americans as References and Role Models in Black Newspapers, – Article (PDF Available) in Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies 11(2) January.